RadioFN Streaming Media Financial Network

RadioFN is your gateway to live financial market news 24/7, home of the "Sector Rotation Money Show", and host to streaming media corporate overviews & interviews of companies.

RadioFN utilizes advanced media server push technology for it's multi-media content that enable the show to go on without delay.

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STANDARDS: RadioFN has a number of established proprietary vehicles that attract a large viewing/listening audiance and thus we must be discerning when reviewing, interviewing, exploring or discussing a company; The management of companies we interview, explore, review or discuss should demonstrate a focus on legitimately maximizing shareholder value. We avoid situations where insiders are simply looking for an exit strategy because they have failed to successfully execute their business plan and/or wish to line their own pockets with unearned wealth. For Terms of Use and Disclaimer & Disclosure regarding RadioFN programming and content please click the link for that section of this website.


CONTENT MANAGEMENT AND DISTRIBUTED NETWORK: RadioFN content management and distributed network deliver media over a very robust, dynamic network architecture that greatly improves the performance of media delivery. Working with InterNAP's Assimilator technologies, our systems deliver media via a distributed network that connects to virtually every major backbone, with routing tables dynamically adjusted on the fly to adjust to the constant changing traffic patterns on the Web. This superior technology provides dramatically improved performance compared to ISPs that utilize conventional fixed routing tables over fewer backbone connections, sending your media down the same path regardless of Web traffic conditions.

The modular architecture of operations eliminates single points of failure, thereby providing maximum uptime while insuring optimal performance. We cluster and load-balance groups of servers into a large server farm. We then replicate that server-farm on the other coast of the North America, so that even our server-farms are fully backed up. Then, at each farm, we utilize sophisticated fiber channel storage area networks that employ RAID and hot-swappable technologies. We back up all this data with robotic data libraries for disaster recover. Then, we co-locate these farms inside of InterNAP's secure data centers, which provides robust power-backup capabilities with 24/7 security and monitoring.

There are benefits to RadioFN's streaming media content servers over basic web servers... Besides the ability to shift to different parts of a content stream while watching/listening, the consistency of deliverability is a key benefit. The easiest way to explain this is to compare it to a car with an automatic transmission versus a manual transmission. Streaming servers are able to change data-transfer rates to the end user automatically during playback (except for QuickTime streaming, which auto-senses the user's selected connection speed and delivers the best media clip designed for that user's connection speed).

Thus, if network congestion arises during playback, streaming servers will accommodate this change in environment and "downshift" the data transfer rate to prevent the media from "rebuffering;" a term used to describe the pausing of player to collect more data before resuming playback. Should the network environment improve, the servers will shift the data transfer rate upward to improve playback quality.

With Web servers, the end user must select a "bit-rate" best suited for that end user and remain at that setting throughout playback. Streaming servers provide streaming in UDP Protocol and HTTP Protocol when the end user is unable to accept UDP Protocol streaming. Web servers can only playback using HTTP Protocol.

Sound like a lot of gibberish or impossible-to-interpret jargon? It's really quite simple. UDP is all about "keeping the show going." If a packet of data is lost on the Internet, UDP says "So what? Let's keep the movie playing!" Thus, a pixel of blue sky or a pixel of brown dirt may be missing in one of the frames, but the movie will play regardless. (Note: film plays at 24 frames per second.)

HTTP is all about accounting. HTTP Protocol says "Whoa! Stop the show, we're missing a pixel of blue sky! Let's re-request it and wait for it." Thus, using HTTP to send a credit card number over the Internet makes sense (you need all those pixels), but using HTTP protocol for streaming media is a real show stopper - literally. 

Below you will find a diagram of our streaming media content delivery network: 


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